Charity at House of Good Deeds goes straight to the end user

Charity at House of Good Deeds goes straight to the end user


When she was unemployed during the pandemic last year, Tracy McAllister discovered a way to get by at the House of Good Deeds pop-up location in Queens where she found an Apple desktop and air fryer; shirts and new sneakers for her young sons; and a used microwave for her mother – all for free.

And she’s paid it all forward by donating items to the charity and volunteering to help the nonprofit’s unique model that cuts out the middleman and puts free donations directly into the hands of people who need them, rather than to charities that primarily sell the merchandise and use the proceeds to fund their work.   

Why We Wrote This

The House of Good Deeds collects items and gives them directly to end users – a pay-it-forward charity model that cuts waste and expenses.

Leon Feingold, a former professional baseball player, lawyer, and real estate agent, founded the organization to promote the pay-it-forward altruism shown to him and his wife when she was terminally ill. He puts in 80 hours a week schlepping donations and organizing giveaways – and takes no salary.

“Do we really need another real estate broker? [A]nother lawyer? I’d like to think and honestly believe,” he says, “that there is more value in what House of Good Deeds does than in a dozen real estate brokers or lawyers.”

New York

In a city with as much abundance as there is need, a tiny Manhattan nonprofit aims to reallocate the excess – one cookie, one blender, and one bike helmet at a time.   

Over the past four years, House of Good Deeds has funneled more than 150,000 pounds of clothes, household items, computers, catering equipment, and more from donors to recipients – keeping it out of landfills. Unlike organizations with concrete goals – disaster relief, ending homelessness, promoting literacy – this shoestring operation has a more profound purpose: fostering altruism. 

“Our overarching mission is to show people how easy it is to help others,” says co-founder and executive director Leon Feingold. His model puts free donations directly into the hands of people who need them, rather than to charities that primarily sell the merchandise and use the proceeds to fund their work. While New York has plenty of places that take donations, House of Good Deeds offers something its brethren don’t (and that anyone decluttering values): quick disposition. This is especially useful in a city where most charities request drop-offs, few folks have cars, and people generally ditch usable but unwanted articles on the sidewalk for lack of storage.

Why We Wrote This

The House of Good Deeds collects items and gives them directly to end users – a pay-it-forward charity model that cuts waste and expenses.

Most days find Mr. Feingold picking up goods across the city, sometimes within hours of a query about pickup. The only stipulation: Things have to work – clothes usable and appliances operable.

“If it’s something you can give to a friend without getting the stink eye in return, it’s probably safe to donate to us,” he says.



Source link

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.