The epidemic of loneliness and why this reader doesn’t want a robot caregiver – Pasadena Star News

The epidemic of loneliness and why this reader doesn’t want a robot caregiver – Pasadena Star News


Obviously, loneliness was a major problem for older people during the pandemic, both at home and as a resident of the facility. I recently read that robots are replacing long-term care workers, especially in Japan. Is that where we are heading? I don’t want robots to take care of me when I get older. Can you provide some more information about this? HN

Dear HN

You asked timely questions as the population is aging and the number of care workers is expected to be too small. By 2034, the number of Americans over the age of 65 will exceed the number of children under the age of 18.By then, we Shortage of 150,000 paid caregivers, According to the New Yorker story.

To AARP reportMaja J. Matarić, a roboticist and professor of computer science at the University of Southern California, said: Predict a larger shortage much earlier.Almost shortage 450,000 by 2025.

In 2017, the US Public Health Commissioner officially declared loneliness as an epidemic for all ages, with 43% of Americans over the age of 60 recognizing themselves as lonely.

Solitude is different from social isolation. Solitude is subjective. That means how we feel because of no contact. Social isolation is objectiveThat means inadequate contact with the outside world. You can count the number of people and contacts. Both have health effects and are thought to trigger an inflammatory response, increasing the risk of dementia, depression, high blood pressure and stroke.

Social isolation not only creates human sacrifice, but also other costs. According to a New Yorker article, socially isolated people arrive at hospitals more ill and stay longer, adding about $ 7 billion to the total cost of Medicare.

Let’s talk about Japan. With the declining birthrate and aging population, we are emerging as a world leader in robotics that takes care of the elderly.According to Reuters, there is a shortage of 380,000 long-term care workers in Japan. By 2025.In response to this, the Government of Japan Development of nursing care robots..

There are pros and cons to using technology to relieve the loneliness of older people. Some experts are concerned that robots do not provide adequate care. Others are concerned that they are used as a method of care for rations and that claiming human cooperation is considered dududu drowning.

Ann World Economic Forum Articles Keep in mind that high-tech solutions are not the answer to your high-touch needs. In addition, the article states that people need care and support, as well as a series of tasks. They need consistent companionship, warmth, and contact with others.

Tamaki Saito, a social problem writer, He expressed concern to The Japan Times.He Quoted The robot “reduces the burden on the caregiver and supports long-term care. However … there is a risk that the care recipient’s spirit may collapse.”

There is advantage For robot care as outlined by Bob Garling of Forbes. He writes about what robots can offer that humans can’t. For example, robots are 24 hours a day, reliable, and don’t get tired or frustrated. They can act as home assistants, help people stay in touch with distant families, and support the day-to-day work and arrangements of older people. In group homes, nursing robots can reduce some of the caregiver’s manual work and increase opportunities to interact with residents. For people with cognitive problems, nursing robots have been shown to provide continuous involvement and psychological stimulation, delaying cognitive decline.

The epidemic of loneliness and why this reader doesn’t want a robot caregiver – Pasadena Star News

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